Season 2, episode 29: “Can anything good come from Delaware?”

If you’ve been following my podcast (and the associated blog) for a while, you know that I’ve come out strongly in favor of varietals that are hybrids between American and French grape strains. I admit, I started out dubious about these varietals, having listened to far too many sommeliers deride these grapes as foxy, unwholesome, and lacking in character. But over the years of doing this podcast, my views have changed. I am now a firm believer in what Ethan Joseph of Iapetus Winery calls “The Triumph of the Hybrids.”

Here before us in this episode is another example of this triumph. Aromella, first bred in 1976, has only recently emerged into the spotlight. Indeed, it is so new that my trusty Wine Grapes book by Jancis Robinson does not even mention it. It is so new to the market, in fact, that the 2017 vintage that Sophia, Peter, and myself imbibe in this episode from Harvest Ridge Winery in Marydel, Delaware, may well have come from the first ever single varietal release of this grape outside of the Finger Lakes!

In case you’re curious, Aromella is a cross between Traminette and Ravat 34, which are two other hybrid wine grapes. Traminette’s parentage includes the vinifera grape Gewurztraminer, which explains the bright floral character we noticed on this vintage in question. The title refers to Peter’s lament that nothing good comes out of Delaware, though in the end, he was convinced that this wine was an exception. Enjoy!

It turns out Peter was wrong: there is one good thing that comes from Delaware at least: this delicious bottle of dessert wine!

Season 2, Episode 24: “Uncle Jake’s Elderberry Wine”

For many of us city folk, our first introduction to Elderberry (and its alcoholic potential) was probably the infamous line from Monty Python and the Holy Grail: “Your mother was a hamster, and your father smelled of Elderberries.” Yet, as it turns out, berries of the Sambucus genus have been used to make wine (and other alcohols: the blooms of Elderberry are used to make St. Germain.) for hundreds of years. And so it is that we return once more to West Virginia in this episode.

James, Megan, and I have never had any wines made from Elderberry, and Uncle Jake’s Elderberry Wine, made by West Virginia Fruit and Berry Company, seemed like a good beginning. Well, there’s also the fact that it was one of the first bottles of West Virginia wine I was able to find in a liquor store in neighboring Maryland! Located in Bridgeport, West Virginia, this winery began life as a fruit company, making jams and preserves, then wines, and is now beginning to make bourbon and rye whiskey as well. The owners, Bob & Becky Titchenal, pride themselves on not using high-fructose corn syrup for their jams and preserves. They also mention that their fruit wines would be a great cocktail mixer; something I wish we had thought of while drinking this bottle.

Anyway, this wine was a really fascinating experience for us, and we hope you enjoy this episode! We never did find out just who Uncle Jake was, but as long as he wasn’t like John Gault, I’m sure I would have enjoyed drinking with him. I will try to get back on my previous upload schedule in July (First and Third Mondays); I truly apologize that uploads have been so erratic. The main problem is that I haven’t been able to find the time to edit my backlog of recordings as often as I’d like, and executive function thanks to ADHD isn’t helping either…

Uncle Jake’s Elderberry Wine is the cornerstone of our second West Virginia Wine Experience. Take a listen!

Episode Four: Virginia

Viognier is a grape with an intriguing history. This white grape, originally from the Northern Rhone Valley of France, and was almost extinct in the 1960’s, has now made a home here in America. For some reason, the State of Virginia has chosen this grape as its State Grape.

The Monticello AVA, where this particular wine we examine today is from, happens to be associated with Thomas Jefferson, one of the earliest American Vinophiles.  One of the earliest attempts at American viticulture was sponsored by this founding father.

In this episode, drinking the 2016 Viognier from Horton Vineyards, Gary and I honestly wonder why the heck this particular grape has become the State Grape of Virginia… because to be honest, this wine was disappointing for both of us. Why? Take a listen. (You can’t win them all, especially if you’re going in blind.)

This bottle was acquired by yours truly on a vacation trip to Washington DC, not from the tasting room, but from Wegman’s Grocery store… which has a surprisingly decent wine selection.

Horton 2016 Viognier
The 2016 Viognier from Horton Vineyards in Orange County, Virginia, is the center-point of Episode Four.