Episode Four: Virginia

Viognier is a grape with an intriguing history. This white grape, originally from the Northern Rhone Valley of France, and was almost extinct in the 1960’s, has now made a home here in America. For some reason, the State of Virginia has chosen this grape as its State Grape.

The Monticello AVA, where this particular wine we examine today is from, happens to be associated with Thomas Jefferson, one of the earliest American Vinophiles.  One of the earliest attempts at American viticulture was sponsored by this founding father.

In this episode, drinking the 2016 Viognier from Horton Vineyards, Gary and I honestly wonder why the heck this particular grape has become the State Grape of Virginia… because to be honest, this wine was disappointing for both of us. Why? Take a listen. (You can’t win them all, especially if you’re going in blind.)

This bottle was acquired by yours truly on a vacation trip to Washington DC, not from the tasting room, but from Wegman’s Grocery store… which has a surprisingly decent wine selection.

Horton 2016 Viognier
The 2016 Viognier from Horton Vineyards in Orange County, Virginia, is the center-point of Episode Four.

 

Episode One: Kentucky

In Episode One of the Make America Grape Again podcast, we will look at Kentucky, home of America’s oldest commercial winery. Yes, that’s right! The oldest commercial winery in America was not in California or Virginia.

The wine in question is the 2014 Reserve Kentucky Norton, from Cave Hill Vineyard and Winery, located in Eubank, Kentucky. What is Norton, anyway? And why is Kentucky home to the oldest commercial winery in the United States? Is there such a thing as a “good” vintage of Norton? Tune in and find out!

This bottle was provided by Gary Kurtz of Greater Than Wines.

Kentucky Norton
Wine number One: 2014 Kentucky Norton Reserve from Cave Hill Vineyard and Winery