Episode 24: Utah

Mysterious, ancient, and full of both Uranium and Mormons, you would expect the Utah landscape to be hostile to winemaking, and among the last places one would imagine wine to be made in the United States.   And… in some ways, you are absolutely correct.  Utah is indeed somewhat hostile to winemaking these days, both climatically and politically. Perhaps that is why the wine in this particular episode was vinified in Colorado at Sutcliffe Vineyards (the same vineyard who produced the Cabernet Franc in our Colorado Episode) from Grapes grown in Montezuma Canyon, near the Four Corners area. This white blend is made of Chenin Blanc, Viognier, Riesling, and Chardonnay; percentages of each grape within this vintage were not available.

The Mormons weren’t always hostile to the grapevine, though; the earliest wine grapes here were planted in the 1860s, right after Mormon settlers colonized the area.  However, the Mormons enthusiastically embraced Prohibition, and it was not until 1989 that hope was rekindled.  The winery which opened that year, Castle Creek Winery, produced 1,500 gallons of quality wine off the bat. Today, there are several small estate wineries producing both vinifera and French-American hybrids, as mentioned in this episode. Vineyards in Utah tend to be located in mountain valleys, with elevations up to 6,000 feet, which create a unique set of circumstances and challenges for growers and winemakers. Winters here are cold, so winter kill and frost damage are real risks; therefore protecting vines in the winter and keeping a watchful eye towards the sky are essential for success.

Currently, Utah has six wineries–somehow making Utah now less of a Prohibition state in terms of viticulture than Nevada. (Go figure!) That being said, the local liquor board does have its own stranglehold on the industry, as it is state-controlled, and does not allow much exporting of finished products outside the state.  This will mean I will have to make a visit to Utah myself… soon.

This bottle was purchased by yours truly at Vino Loco, a wine shop located in downtown Flagstaff, Arizona.

utah
The 2014 White Blend from Sutcliffe Vineyards, sourced from Montezuma Canyon, is our First Utah vintage.

Episode 9: Colorado

Welcome to Episode 9 of the Make America Grape Again Podcast; in this episode, we will be exploring Colorado for the first time!

Colorado is a land of extremes, with everything from towering mountains that scrape the heavens to high plains and deserts. It is also a land with some fascinating viticultural potential, producing both vinifera and fruit wines. The Palisades region, also known as the Grand Valley AVA, is perhaps the central point of the thriving viticultural industry in Colorado. Our wine of the day, the 2015 Colorado Cabernet Franc from Sutcliffe Vineyards, is sourced from this AVA.

This episode provides an introduction on how to approach making wine tasting notes, and Old World versus new world approaches to viticulture, as we were all gathered to help my friend Jen Condon (who provided the bottle) with some homework for her classes in the viticultural program at Yavapai College.  An entire podcast featuring Old World vs. New World wines and their approaches will be posted on my other website in the near future.

Cabernet Franc Count: 2

The 2015 Colorado Cabernet Franc from Sutcliffe Vineyards was sourced from the Grand Valley AVA. Here it is at dusk.

Episode Eight: Wyoming

We are going to something just a little different for the time being when it comes to our first episode featuring the Equality State.  Or the Cowboy State.  Whichever.

You see, when Gary was travelling through Wyoming a few months ago, he couldn’t find any wines in the local liquor and bottle shops that were made locally.  He was told by staff in these places that there wasn’t any wine at all made in Wyoming. (Which is wrong, there are at least three wineries in the state of Wyoming, and one of them even grows their varietals on site, but so it goes.)

But he did find a whiskey.  A Bourbon Whiskey, to be precise.  As it turns out, there are a lot of misconceptions surrounding what, exactly, a Bourbon is.  Bourbon, as it turns out, does not have to be made in Kentucky after all.  Pull up an Old-Fashioned glass, pour a libation, and plug in your headphones for our examination of the Wyoming Whiskey: Small Batch Bourbon Whiskey.

 Wyoming Whiskey: Small Batch Bourbon Whiskey.
Yes, that is a Deathstar ice cube… and I am aware that this isn’t the best glass to try spirits, but it is what I had for the Wyoming Whiskey: Small Batch Bourbon Whiskey.